Honouliuli National Monument

Honouliuli National Monument

Monument Details

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“The internment of Japanese Americans was a very painful chapter in their lives and forever changed the course of history.  It still is very meaningful to the current generation and the future generation that it happened. The internment happened, it was wrong, and we don’t want people to forget,” Carole Hayashino, President and Executive Director, Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai’i

The Honouliuli National Monument preserves the site of the largest and longest operating World War II prison camp in Hawai’i.

The monument will tell the difficult story of internment and martial law in Hawai’i during World War II. The designation also provides an opportunity to interpret and understand our nation’s complex history associated of civil rights during times of conflict.

Located on the island of Oahu, in a steep canyon not far from Pearl Harbor, the camp imprisoned 400 Japanese-Americans, and Japanese, German and Italian civilians solely on the basis of ancestry or country of origin. 4,000 prisoners of war were incarcerated at the Honouliuli Internment Camp.

Prior to this national monument designation, only two of our country’s national parks and monuments centered on Asian Americans. As a national monument, the lessons and legacy of the Japanese-American internment will now be preserved and shared with future generations.

The camp was largely forgotten until uncovered in 2002. The announcement of the designation was made 73 years to the day after President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the executive order paving the way for the internment of Japanese Americans. The designation was signed on February 24, 2015.

Public Input

  • Since 2011, the National Park Service held several public scoping meetings on the six main islands in Hawaiʻi.
  • Hundreds of people attended public meetings and petitions of support from more than 6,000 Americans were sent to the Secretary of the Interior.
  • Local, state, and federal government officials and stakeholders including the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii and the Japanese American Citizens League were consulted.